Liner cavity wear repair

Post Reply
gtv-racer
Platinum
Platinum
Posts: 212
Joined: Tue May 12, 2009 12:02 pm

Liner cavity wear repair

Post by gtv-racer » Sat Nov 29, 2014 2:37 am

The plated coating is worn of at some places at the liners after cleaning. Is this an issue?

If so can it be repaired?
For example replating or just maybe with a nice heat resistant spay paint ( heat conductive problems? )

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Rust-Oleum- ... 2599d4a66f

Looks like a nice product.
MR2 Zig
Verde
Verde
Posts: 766
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:47 pm
Location: Fresno, Ca.
Contact:

Re: Liner cavity wear repair

Post by MR2 Zig » Sat Nov 29, 2014 1:39 pm

Are you talking about the cylinder liners? The 3.0l ones I bought were not coated at all, but for anti-corrosion during shipping (oil/wax coating).
MR1 Zig (I made rate!)
Machinery Repairman USNR
Jim K
Verde
Verde
Posts: 1721
Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2004 12:10 am
Location: Athens,Greece

Re: Liner cavity wear repair

Post by Jim K » Sat Nov 29, 2014 11:33 pm

MR2 Zig wrote:Are you talking about the cylinder liners? The 3.0l ones I bought were not coated at all, but for anti-corrosion during shipping (oil/wax coating).
Very true, as were mine. Someone in Italy -or wherever- decided to cut costs... :x
Here's a pic of one of my new liners after chamfering to allow rotation of the Maxspeeding rods with a 3.2 crank... All 6 had the same done.
I don't believe there's any kind of paint suitable for liner protection and heat conduction which will endure in hot water. Proper anti-corrosive plating is the only solution, but who/where/how much?
Jim K.
Image
gtv-racer
Platinum
Platinum
Posts: 212
Joined: Tue May 12, 2009 12:02 pm

Re: Liner cavity wear repair

Post by gtv-racer » Sun Nov 30, 2014 4:51 am

https://www.google.nl/url?sa=t&rct=j&q= ... 2063,d.ZWU

http://www.google.com/patents/US20060249105

What do you guys think of manganese phosphate coating.
You can do it at home and i saw some places where they coated diesel cylinders.
MR2 Zig
Verde
Verde
Posts: 766
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:47 pm
Location: Fresno, Ca.
Contact:

Re: Liner cavity wear repair

Post by MR2 Zig » Sun Nov 30, 2014 3:19 pm

Manganese phosphate, or Parkerizing, is both a protective layer of a sacrificial material and a porous surface that will hold oil. It will increase the outer or inner diameter of a finished part, but I don't know the process well enough to say by how much.

The regular glycol based coolant does resist corrosion as do some of the "Water Wetter" type of products. You do have to maintain your coolant with them though.

What is your goal here? Better heat transfer? Put more surface area on the cylinder by machining rings, grooves or dimples. To my knowledge the surface treatments available will only give better insulation.

I hope I'm being helpful,

Scott
MR1 Zig (I made rate!)
Machinery Repairman USNR
gtv-racer
Platinum
Platinum
Posts: 212
Joined: Tue May 12, 2009 12:02 pm

Re: Liner cavity wear repair

Post by gtv-racer » Mon Dec 01, 2014 8:54 am

My goal is rust prevetion.
Some liners had rust on them becauce lost coating.
Don't know or it is from normal wear of the 270dkm the engine did and bad coolant refreshment intervals by previous owners or it is from cavity wear due to the higher dynamic compression ratio from the supercharger.

So i think a coating is always nice if you have the correct one.
Rust on your liners also isolate. And i don't think a thin coating is a problem if you compare it with rust coating :wink:
MR2 Zig
Verde
Verde
Posts: 766
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 9:47 pm
Location: Fresno, Ca.
Contact:

Re: Liner cavity wear repair

Post by MR2 Zig » Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:26 pm

You could have them done in what I know as "industrial hard chrome". Its thin, but does add to the dimension, is somewhat rust resistant, and because it is metal will still conduct heat well. I think it can be put only on the surfaces that see water. This isn't the bright shiny stuff of 50's American cars, but is used mostly as a wear resistant coating.
MR1 Zig (I made rate!)
Machinery Repairman USNR
Post Reply